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Sign Finds | San Francisco
1. Surf Motel, Marina/Cow Hollow2. Super Duper Burgers, Marina/Cow Hollow - Nice handy-work here from New Bohemia3. Queens Shoes, The MissionOriginal Content. © All images copyright The Fold.
Sign Finds | San Francisco
1. Surf Motel, Marina/Cow Hollow2. Super Duper Burgers, Marina/Cow Hollow - Nice handy-work here from New Bohemia3. Queens Shoes, The MissionOriginal Content. © All images copyright The Fold.
Sign Finds | San Francisco
1. Surf Motel, Marina/Cow Hollow2. Super Duper Burgers, Marina/Cow Hollow - Nice handy-work here from New Bohemia3. Queens Shoes, The MissionOriginal Content. © All images copyright The Fold.

Sign Finds | San Francisco

1. Surf Motel, Marina/Cow Hollow
2. Super Duper Burgers, Marina/Cow Hollow - Nice handy-work here from New Bohemia
3. Queens Shoes, The Mission
Original Content.
© All images copyright The Fold.

Sunday 16/09/12 2 notes   Reblog
 
There is a seemingly endless supply of Mid Century modern shopping to be had in California and San Fransisco is no exception. In The Mission alone there is enough to keep you busy, from high-end, hand picked Danish design to old school thrift store digging. Reading this post here makes me feel like I barely scratched below the (teak veneer) surface in the short time I was there. It’s a bittersweet affair when passing through a city like San Fran, there’s only so much you can pack into a suitcase. That said, there’s always room for a mint condition, anodized atomic style electric skillet no matter where in the world you are. There is a seemingly endless supply of Mid Century modern shopping to be had in California and San Fransisco is no exception. In The Mission alone there is enough to keep you busy, from high-end, hand picked Danish design to old school thrift store digging. Reading this post here makes me feel like I barely scratched below the (teak veneer) surface in the short time I was there. It’s a bittersweet affair when passing through a city like San Fran, there’s only so much you can pack into a suitcase. That said, there’s always room for a mint condition, anodized atomic style electric skillet no matter where in the world you are. There is a seemingly endless supply of Mid Century modern shopping to be had in California and San Fransisco is no exception. In The Mission alone there is enough to keep you busy, from high-end, hand picked Danish design to old school thrift store digging. Reading this post here makes me feel like I barely scratched below the (teak veneer) surface in the short time I was there. It’s a bittersweet affair when passing through a city like San Fran, there’s only so much you can pack into a suitcase. That said, there’s always room for a mint condition, anodized atomic style electric skillet no matter where in the world you are. There is a seemingly endless supply of Mid Century modern shopping to be had in California and San Fransisco is no exception. In The Mission alone there is enough to keep you busy, from high-end, hand picked Danish design to old school thrift store digging. Reading this post here makes me feel like I barely scratched below the (teak veneer) surface in the short time I was there. It’s a bittersweet affair when passing through a city like San Fran, there’s only so much you can pack into a suitcase. That said, there’s always room for a mint condition, anodized atomic style electric skillet no matter where in the world you are.

There is a seemingly endless supply of Mid Century modern shopping to be had in California and San Fransisco is no exception. In The Mission alone there is enough to keep you busy, from high-end, hand picked Danish design to old school thrift store digging. Reading this post here makes me feel like I barely scratched below the (teak veneer) surface in the short time I was there. It’s a bittersweet affair when passing through a city like San Fran, there’s only so much you can pack into a suitcase. That said, there’s always room for a mint condition, anodized atomic style electric skillet no matter where in the world you are.

Sunday 16/09/12 4 notes   Reblog
 
Sign Finds | Misson Street Marquee Mile
Walking down the Mission District end of Mission Street it’s hard not to notice the number of vacant theatres peppered along the strip. As far as sign finds go, old theatre marquees are among some of the biggest, boldest and most extravagant examples you’re likely to see, so finding five early 20th century marquees on the one street was teetering on a signage overload. Seeing so many in such a concentrated strip was almost eerie. They’re huge structures and have some real presence, especially in the case of the Cine Latino and the New Mission Theatre which are set on opposing sides of the road, the two huge signs towering over the relatively small street below. I ran out of light and time to photograph all of them as thoroughly as I would have liked, but what I did shoot has gone some way to capturing that walk through the Mission. A little miffed by the state of all five theatres I set out to find some background to their current condition, turning up some great archive shots and history in the process. Over time as in other cities, the popularity of TV and home entertainment in the 50’s started the decline of the boom years of America’s cinemas with these grand theatres gradually becoming redundant, unprofitable and as attendance declined were inevitably forced to call it a day. Understandable that as times change, a city and its businesses have to adapt and evolve to suit, it’s just a shame these showy examples of a Golden Age for both cinema and signage haven’t been put to better use - be it restored, respectfully re-purposed or at the very least maintained the for the sake of the city’s local history. Having now survived to an era that should recognise their historic value, it’s madness to not preserve what’s left. A quick look at the list of closed cinemas (not counting demolished) in San Francisco alone is mind blowing.My rabbit-hole of Googling took me to a wide range of websites, blogs, archives and library sites, with Cinema Treasures again proving to be an invaluable (and impressively well ordered) resource for digging into the fading face of America’s booming cinema years. I’ve included a list of links and references at the end of the post if you’re keen for a dig.  From 19th to 23rd and Mission we have what’s left of the El Capitan, Tower, Cine Latino, New Mission and The Grand. Between them represents a period of cinema spanning from as early as 1913 to as recent as 1998. All are shown below with all archive shots courtesy the SFPL.
El Capitan Theatre

At one time the second biggest movie theatre in San Francisco, the El Capitan Theatre was demolished in 1961, with only the Mexican Baroque facade left standing. The 2000+ seat auditorium was completely levelled with a budget outdoor parking lot now left in its place. With the huge facade and only the shell of the foyer still in tact, the El Capitan is the grandest and as equally depressing entrances to a crappy car park you’re likely to find. Peep your head in and check out what remains of the foyer interior.
Tower Theater

First opening as The Majestic Theater in 1912, the Tower Theater was remodelled in a Streamline Moderne style in 1937, majority of which can be seen decaying away today. I’m not sure at what point the vertical TOWER typeface changed to the serif style seen today but from the photos I have found you can see the original style was in use at least until 1975. After closing in 1996, the theatre was used as a church up until 2005 and is currently up for lease. Let’s hope those interior murals are still in tact.
Cine Latino

What now stands as the Cine Latino originally opened as the Wigwam Theatre 1913. With two name changes in between (New Rialoto Theatre in 1935 and the Crown Theatre 1947-74) this workhorse of a movie house has paid its dues, playing host to Latin and Mexican cinema throughout the 70’s until its closure in 1987. With humble beginnings and origins dating back to the San Francisco earthquake in 1906, the Wigwam deserves more than to be left to rot. Hidden amongst the the Cinema Treasures listing for the Cine Latino, a visitor comment outlines the origins of the Wigwam as starting literally as a wigwam to entertain the displaced people of San Francisco in the wake of the massive earthquake that shook majority of the city to the ground. From this small canvas tent grew a bigger tent, then a wooden theatre and then finally the building that now stands on Mission Ave. I’m keen find out more about that evolution from tent to theatre and dig up some more shots of the Wigwam as it grew. If that account checks out it’s an amazing story and in itself a huge reason to revive or at the very least preserve or restore what is left of the signage/facade. The Cine Latino sign is still an eye catcher and with the New Misson directly across the road it’s an interesting pocket of the Mission.
Grand Theater

The Grand Theater opened in 1940, operating primarily as “unpretentious third run neighbourhood house” up until its closure in 1988. Described as a mecca for b-grade, horror and sci-fi movies, the Grand Theater in the late 60’s/70’s sounds like my kind of place. With triple features the norm, no doubt a few Corman masterpieces would have graced the big screen here.Some more Googling turned up some some slightly off topic but interesting info on the cult horror cinema scene in SF. Outlining the horror movie history of the Grand on Cinema Treasures, August Ragone is also the author of a killer book on Eiji Tsuburaya (creator of Godzilla and Ultra Man among a mirrade other things) and a purveyor of underground film events in San Francisco. With the Grand now a cheap import store there’s little chance of the ‘gory’ years of the Grand making a rise from the dead, but it’s great to see the spirit and impact of its years as a gore and sci-fi haunt still kicking in some shape or from. More on August at http://shock-it-to-me.com and http://augustragone.blogspot.com
New Mission Theater

Built in 1916 and fully renovated in a balls-out Art Deco style in 1932, the New Mission Theatre with its sky high marquee is impressive even in its present day state. Like many of these theatres, the New Mission has seen its share of controversy and proposed plans since its closure as a theatre in 1993. Playing horror flicks throughout the 80’s and finally closing in the 90’s due in most part to dwindling attendance, The New Misson’s closure and deterioration is a familiar story. Maybe in part due to the fact the impressive theatre interior is relatively in tact, the New Mission seems to be the most likely of the theatres in the area to have any hope of a complete and deserved restoration. Overcoming the San Francisco City College plans to redevelop/demolish the building as campus space in the late 90’s, preservationists have been working to give the New Mission Theatre a new lease on life for over 10 years. Finally achieving landmark status in 2004, plans for a redevelopment of the theatre for a re-purposed/mixed-use space have been off and off since.
While putting this post together, new info on the New Mission’s future has been made public and from a brief read it’s looking like good news for once. Alamo Drafthouse, an Austin-based cinema chain (with a theatre etiquette policy and public relations approach that should be given a standing ovation) - have prosed a restoration and reopening of the theatre in 2013. More details here. Amazing if all goes to plan. Hopefully next time I’m back in San Fran that towering marquee will be up in lights. With this news, I also came across some recent pics of the theatre interior posted up on the Alamo Facebook page and some Flickr shots here. Great to see the level of detail and fairly in-tact state of the interior.
As a flip side to historical value and preservation, I’ve always had an interest in abandoned buildings and spaces and looking at the those Flickr pics it’s no wonder the Mission Theatre has played host to a free party two in its time. Possibly the ideal progression for America’s grand theatres - the Golden Years, the decline, the non-damaging free party era and the all important restoration. As much as it would be amazing if all of these theatres were still thriving and cared for, the fact is they’ve been left behind and left neglected due to lack of funds, lack of profitably and changing times. It’s the free market that built them, and seemingly the free market that will destroy them. The decline, the free parties, the rotting signs as they stand today as are much a part of the history as the ornate foyers an lavish entrances. In the case of the New Mission at least, history, present day commercial interests and nostalgia may find a workable balance.
What started out as some casual research into the background of this epic strip of busted out signage soon spiralled into a knee-deep dig into the fact and fiction behind San Fransisco’s old school movie houses. This post couldn’t have come together without the below reference and resources. Some great stuff in there if you have a spare week or two. Enjoy!
Cinema TreasuresThe Friends of 1800The San Francisco Neighbourhood Theater FoundationThe San Francisco Public LibraryThe San Francisco Chronicle Cinema Tour
Sign Finds | Misson Street Marquee Mile
Walking down the Mission District end of Mission Street it’s hard not to notice the number of vacant theatres peppered along the strip. As far as sign finds go, old theatre marquees are among some of the biggest, boldest and most extravagant examples you’re likely to see, so finding five early 20th century marquees on the one street was teetering on a signage overload. Seeing so many in such a concentrated strip was almost eerie. They’re huge structures and have some real presence, especially in the case of the Cine Latino and the New Mission Theatre which are set on opposing sides of the road, the two huge signs towering over the relatively small street below. I ran out of light and time to photograph all of them as thoroughly as I would have liked, but what I did shoot has gone some way to capturing that walk through the Mission. A little miffed by the state of all five theatres I set out to find some background to their current condition, turning up some great archive shots and history in the process. Over time as in other cities, the popularity of TV and home entertainment in the 50’s started the decline of the boom years of America’s cinemas with these grand theatres gradually becoming redundant, unprofitable and as attendance declined were inevitably forced to call it a day. Understandable that as times change, a city and its businesses have to adapt and evolve to suit, it’s just a shame these showy examples of a Golden Age for both cinema and signage haven’t been put to better use - be it restored, respectfully re-purposed or at the very least maintained the for the sake of the city’s local history. Having now survived to an era that should recognise their historic value, it’s madness to not preserve what’s left. A quick look at the list of closed cinemas (not counting demolished) in San Francisco alone is mind blowing.My rabbit-hole of Googling took me to a wide range of websites, blogs, archives and library sites, with Cinema Treasures again proving to be an invaluable (and impressively well ordered) resource for digging into the fading face of America’s booming cinema years. I’ve included a list of links and references at the end of the post if you’re keen for a dig.  From 19th to 23rd and Mission we have what’s left of the El Capitan, Tower, Cine Latino, New Mission and The Grand. Between them represents a period of cinema spanning from as early as 1913 to as recent as 1998. All are shown below with all archive shots courtesy the SFPL.
El Capitan Theatre

At one time the second biggest movie theatre in San Francisco, the El Capitan Theatre was demolished in 1961, with only the Mexican Baroque facade left standing. The 2000+ seat auditorium was completely levelled with a budget outdoor parking lot now left in its place. With the huge facade and only the shell of the foyer still in tact, the El Capitan is the grandest and as equally depressing entrances to a crappy car park you’re likely to find. Peep your head in and check out what remains of the foyer interior.
Tower Theater

First opening as The Majestic Theater in 1912, the Tower Theater was remodelled in a Streamline Moderne style in 1937, majority of which can be seen decaying away today. I’m not sure at what point the vertical TOWER typeface changed to the serif style seen today but from the photos I have found you can see the original style was in use at least until 1975. After closing in 1996, the theatre was used as a church up until 2005 and is currently up for lease. Let’s hope those interior murals are still in tact.
Cine Latino

What now stands as the Cine Latino originally opened as the Wigwam Theatre 1913. With two name changes in between (New Rialoto Theatre in 1935 and the Crown Theatre 1947-74) this workhorse of a movie house has paid its dues, playing host to Latin and Mexican cinema throughout the 70’s until its closure in 1987. With humble beginnings and origins dating back to the San Francisco earthquake in 1906, the Wigwam deserves more than to be left to rot. Hidden amongst the the Cinema Treasures listing for the Cine Latino, a visitor comment outlines the origins of the Wigwam as starting literally as a wigwam to entertain the displaced people of San Francisco in the wake of the massive earthquake that shook majority of the city to the ground. From this small canvas tent grew a bigger tent, then a wooden theatre and then finally the building that now stands on Mission Ave. I’m keen find out more about that evolution from tent to theatre and dig up some more shots of the Wigwam as it grew. If that account checks out it’s an amazing story and in itself a huge reason to revive or at the very least preserve or restore what is left of the signage/facade. The Cine Latino sign is still an eye catcher and with the New Misson directly across the road it’s an interesting pocket of the Mission.
Grand Theater

The Grand Theater opened in 1940, operating primarily as “unpretentious third run neighbourhood house” up until its closure in 1988. Described as a mecca for b-grade, horror and sci-fi movies, the Grand Theater in the late 60’s/70’s sounds like my kind of place. With triple features the norm, no doubt a few Corman masterpieces would have graced the big screen here.Some more Googling turned up some some slightly off topic but interesting info on the cult horror cinema scene in SF. Outlining the horror movie history of the Grand on Cinema Treasures, August Ragone is also the author of a killer book on Eiji Tsuburaya (creator of Godzilla and Ultra Man among a mirrade other things) and a purveyor of underground film events in San Francisco. With the Grand now a cheap import store there’s little chance of the ‘gory’ years of the Grand making a rise from the dead, but it’s great to see the spirit and impact of its years as a gore and sci-fi haunt still kicking in some shape or from. More on August at http://shock-it-to-me.com and http://augustragone.blogspot.com
New Mission Theater

Built in 1916 and fully renovated in a balls-out Art Deco style in 1932, the New Mission Theatre with its sky high marquee is impressive even in its present day state. Like many of these theatres, the New Mission has seen its share of controversy and proposed plans since its closure as a theatre in 1993. Playing horror flicks throughout the 80’s and finally closing in the 90’s due in most part to dwindling attendance, The New Misson’s closure and deterioration is a familiar story. Maybe in part due to the fact the impressive theatre interior is relatively in tact, the New Mission seems to be the most likely of the theatres in the area to have any hope of a complete and deserved restoration. Overcoming the San Francisco City College plans to redevelop/demolish the building as campus space in the late 90’s, preservationists have been working to give the New Mission Theatre a new lease on life for over 10 years. Finally achieving landmark status in 2004, plans for a redevelopment of the theatre for a re-purposed/mixed-use space have been off and off since.
While putting this post together, new info on the New Mission’s future has been made public and from a brief read it’s looking like good news for once. Alamo Drafthouse, an Austin-based cinema chain (with a theatre etiquette policy and public relations approach that should be given a standing ovation) - have prosed a restoration and reopening of the theatre in 2013. More details here. Amazing if all goes to plan. Hopefully next time I’m back in San Fran that towering marquee will be up in lights. With this news, I also came across some recent pics of the theatre interior posted up on the Alamo Facebook page and some Flickr shots here. Great to see the level of detail and fairly in-tact state of the interior.
As a flip side to historical value and preservation, I’ve always had an interest in abandoned buildings and spaces and looking at the those Flickr pics it’s no wonder the Mission Theatre has played host to a free party two in its time. Possibly the ideal progression for America’s grand theatres - the Golden Years, the decline, the non-damaging free party era and the all important restoration. As much as it would be amazing if all of these theatres were still thriving and cared for, the fact is they’ve been left behind and left neglected due to lack of funds, lack of profitably and changing times. It’s the free market that built them, and seemingly the free market that will destroy them. The decline, the free parties, the rotting signs as they stand today as are much a part of the history as the ornate foyers an lavish entrances. In the case of the New Mission at least, history, present day commercial interests and nostalgia may find a workable balance.
What started out as some casual research into the background of this epic strip of busted out signage soon spiralled into a knee-deep dig into the fact and fiction behind San Fransisco’s old school movie houses. This post couldn’t have come together without the below reference and resources. Some great stuff in there if you have a spare week or two. Enjoy!
Cinema TreasuresThe Friends of 1800The San Francisco Neighbourhood Theater FoundationThe San Francisco Public LibraryThe San Francisco Chronicle Cinema Tour
Sign Finds | Misson Street Marquee Mile
Walking down the Mission District end of Mission Street it’s hard not to notice the number of vacant theatres peppered along the strip. As far as sign finds go, old theatre marquees are among some of the biggest, boldest and most extravagant examples you’re likely to see, so finding five early 20th century marquees on the one street was teetering on a signage overload. Seeing so many in such a concentrated strip was almost eerie. They’re huge structures and have some real presence, especially in the case of the Cine Latino and the New Mission Theatre which are set on opposing sides of the road, the two huge signs towering over the relatively small street below. I ran out of light and time to photograph all of them as thoroughly as I would have liked, but what I did shoot has gone some way to capturing that walk through the Mission. A little miffed by the state of all five theatres I set out to find some background to their current condition, turning up some great archive shots and history in the process. Over time as in other cities, the popularity of TV and home entertainment in the 50’s started the decline of the boom years of America’s cinemas with these grand theatres gradually becoming redundant, unprofitable and as attendance declined were inevitably forced to call it a day. Understandable that as times change, a city and its businesses have to adapt and evolve to suit, it’s just a shame these showy examples of a Golden Age for both cinema and signage haven’t been put to better use - be it restored, respectfully re-purposed or at the very least maintained the for the sake of the city’s local history. Having now survived to an era that should recognise their historic value, it’s madness to not preserve what’s left. A quick look at the list of closed cinemas (not counting demolished) in San Francisco alone is mind blowing.My rabbit-hole of Googling took me to a wide range of websites, blogs, archives and library sites, with Cinema Treasures again proving to be an invaluable (and impressively well ordered) resource for digging into the fading face of America’s booming cinema years. I’ve included a list of links and references at the end of the post if you’re keen for a dig.  From 19th to 23rd and Mission we have what’s left of the El Capitan, Tower, Cine Latino, New Mission and The Grand. Between them represents a period of cinema spanning from as early as 1913 to as recent as 1998. All are shown below with all archive shots courtesy the SFPL.
El Capitan Theatre

At one time the second biggest movie theatre in San Francisco, the El Capitan Theatre was demolished in 1961, with only the Mexican Baroque facade left standing. The 2000+ seat auditorium was completely levelled with a budget outdoor parking lot now left in its place. With the huge facade and only the shell of the foyer still in tact, the El Capitan is the grandest and as equally depressing entrances to a crappy car park you’re likely to find. Peep your head in and check out what remains of the foyer interior.
Tower Theater

First opening as The Majestic Theater in 1912, the Tower Theater was remodelled in a Streamline Moderne style in 1937, majority of which can be seen decaying away today. I’m not sure at what point the vertical TOWER typeface changed to the serif style seen today but from the photos I have found you can see the original style was in use at least until 1975. After closing in 1996, the theatre was used as a church up until 2005 and is currently up for lease. Let’s hope those interior murals are still in tact.
Cine Latino

What now stands as the Cine Latino originally opened as the Wigwam Theatre 1913. With two name changes in between (New Rialoto Theatre in 1935 and the Crown Theatre 1947-74) this workhorse of a movie house has paid its dues, playing host to Latin and Mexican cinema throughout the 70’s until its closure in 1987. With humble beginnings and origins dating back to the San Francisco earthquake in 1906, the Wigwam deserves more than to be left to rot. Hidden amongst the the Cinema Treasures listing for the Cine Latino, a visitor comment outlines the origins of the Wigwam as starting literally as a wigwam to entertain the displaced people of San Francisco in the wake of the massive earthquake that shook majority of the city to the ground. From this small canvas tent grew a bigger tent, then a wooden theatre and then finally the building that now stands on Mission Ave. I’m keen find out more about that evolution from tent to theatre and dig up some more shots of the Wigwam as it grew. If that account checks out it’s an amazing story and in itself a huge reason to revive or at the very least preserve or restore what is left of the signage/facade. The Cine Latino sign is still an eye catcher and with the New Misson directly across the road it’s an interesting pocket of the Mission.
Grand Theater

The Grand Theater opened in 1940, operating primarily as “unpretentious third run neighbourhood house” up until its closure in 1988. Described as a mecca for b-grade, horror and sci-fi movies, the Grand Theater in the late 60’s/70’s sounds like my kind of place. With triple features the norm, no doubt a few Corman masterpieces would have graced the big screen here.Some more Googling turned up some some slightly off topic but interesting info on the cult horror cinema scene in SF. Outlining the horror movie history of the Grand on Cinema Treasures, August Ragone is also the author of a killer book on Eiji Tsuburaya (creator of Godzilla and Ultra Man among a mirrade other things) and a purveyor of underground film events in San Francisco. With the Grand now a cheap import store there’s little chance of the ‘gory’ years of the Grand making a rise from the dead, but it’s great to see the spirit and impact of its years as a gore and sci-fi haunt still kicking in some shape or from. More on August at http://shock-it-to-me.com and http://augustragone.blogspot.com
New Mission Theater

Built in 1916 and fully renovated in a balls-out Art Deco style in 1932, the New Mission Theatre with its sky high marquee is impressive even in its present day state. Like many of these theatres, the New Mission has seen its share of controversy and proposed plans since its closure as a theatre in 1993. Playing horror flicks throughout the 80’s and finally closing in the 90’s due in most part to dwindling attendance, The New Misson’s closure and deterioration is a familiar story. Maybe in part due to the fact the impressive theatre interior is relatively in tact, the New Mission seems to be the most likely of the theatres in the area to have any hope of a complete and deserved restoration. Overcoming the San Francisco City College plans to redevelop/demolish the building as campus space in the late 90’s, preservationists have been working to give the New Mission Theatre a new lease on life for over 10 years. Finally achieving landmark status in 2004, plans for a redevelopment of the theatre for a re-purposed/mixed-use space have been off and off since.
While putting this post together, new info on the New Mission’s future has been made public and from a brief read it’s looking like good news for once. Alamo Drafthouse, an Austin-based cinema chain (with a theatre etiquette policy and public relations approach that should be given a standing ovation) - have prosed a restoration and reopening of the theatre in 2013. More details here. Amazing if all goes to plan. Hopefully next time I’m back in San Fran that towering marquee will be up in lights. With this news, I also came across some recent pics of the theatre interior posted up on the Alamo Facebook page and some Flickr shots here. Great to see the level of detail and fairly in-tact state of the interior.
As a flip side to historical value and preservation, I’ve always had an interest in abandoned buildings and spaces and looking at the those Flickr pics it’s no wonder the Mission Theatre has played host to a free party two in its time. Possibly the ideal progression for America’s grand theatres - the Golden Years, the decline, the non-damaging free party era and the all important restoration. As much as it would be amazing if all of these theatres were still thriving and cared for, the fact is they’ve been left behind and left neglected due to lack of funds, lack of profitably and changing times. It’s the free market that built them, and seemingly the free market that will destroy them. The decline, the free parties, the rotting signs as they stand today as are much a part of the history as the ornate foyers an lavish entrances. In the case of the New Mission at least, history, present day commercial interests and nostalgia may find a workable balance.
What started out as some casual research into the background of this epic strip of busted out signage soon spiralled into a knee-deep dig into the fact and fiction behind San Fransisco’s old school movie houses. This post couldn’t have come together without the below reference and resources. Some great stuff in there if you have a spare week or two. Enjoy!
Cinema TreasuresThe Friends of 1800The San Francisco Neighbourhood Theater FoundationThe San Francisco Public LibraryThe San Francisco Chronicle Cinema Tour
Sign Finds | Misson Street Marquee Mile
Walking down the Mission District end of Mission Street it’s hard not to notice the number of vacant theatres peppered along the strip. As far as sign finds go, old theatre marquees are among some of the biggest, boldest and most extravagant examples you’re likely to see, so finding five early 20th century marquees on the one street was teetering on a signage overload. Seeing so many in such a concentrated strip was almost eerie. They’re huge structures and have some real presence, especially in the case of the Cine Latino and the New Mission Theatre which are set on opposing sides of the road, the two huge signs towering over the relatively small street below. I ran out of light and time to photograph all of them as thoroughly as I would have liked, but what I did shoot has gone some way to capturing that walk through the Mission. A little miffed by the state of all five theatres I set out to find some background to their current condition, turning up some great archive shots and history in the process. Over time as in other cities, the popularity of TV and home entertainment in the 50’s started the decline of the boom years of America’s cinemas with these grand theatres gradually becoming redundant, unprofitable and as attendance declined were inevitably forced to call it a day. Understandable that as times change, a city and its businesses have to adapt and evolve to suit, it’s just a shame these showy examples of a Golden Age for both cinema and signage haven’t been put to better use - be it restored, respectfully re-purposed or at the very least maintained the for the sake of the city’s local history. Having now survived to an era that should recognise their historic value, it’s madness to not preserve what’s left. A quick look at the list of closed cinemas (not counting demolished) in San Francisco alone is mind blowing.My rabbit-hole of Googling took me to a wide range of websites, blogs, archives and library sites, with Cinema Treasures again proving to be an invaluable (and impressively well ordered) resource for digging into the fading face of America’s booming cinema years. I’ve included a list of links and references at the end of the post if you’re keen for a dig.  From 19th to 23rd and Mission we have what’s left of the El Capitan, Tower, Cine Latino, New Mission and The Grand. Between them represents a period of cinema spanning from as early as 1913 to as recent as 1998. All are shown below with all archive shots courtesy the SFPL.
El Capitan Theatre

At one time the second biggest movie theatre in San Francisco, the El Capitan Theatre was demolished in 1961, with only the Mexican Baroque facade left standing. The 2000+ seat auditorium was completely levelled with a budget outdoor parking lot now left in its place. With the huge facade and only the shell of the foyer still in tact, the El Capitan is the grandest and as equally depressing entrances to a crappy car park you’re likely to find. Peep your head in and check out what remains of the foyer interior.
Tower Theater

First opening as The Majestic Theater in 1912, the Tower Theater was remodelled in a Streamline Moderne style in 1937, majority of which can be seen decaying away today. I’m not sure at what point the vertical TOWER typeface changed to the serif style seen today but from the photos I have found you can see the original style was in use at least until 1975. After closing in 1996, the theatre was used as a church up until 2005 and is currently up for lease. Let’s hope those interior murals are still in tact.
Cine Latino

What now stands as the Cine Latino originally opened as the Wigwam Theatre 1913. With two name changes in between (New Rialoto Theatre in 1935 and the Crown Theatre 1947-74) this workhorse of a movie house has paid its dues, playing host to Latin and Mexican cinema throughout the 70’s until its closure in 1987. With humble beginnings and origins dating back to the San Francisco earthquake in 1906, the Wigwam deserves more than to be left to rot. Hidden amongst the the Cinema Treasures listing for the Cine Latino, a visitor comment outlines the origins of the Wigwam as starting literally as a wigwam to entertain the displaced people of San Francisco in the wake of the massive earthquake that shook majority of the city to the ground. From this small canvas tent grew a bigger tent, then a wooden theatre and then finally the building that now stands on Mission Ave. I’m keen find out more about that evolution from tent to theatre and dig up some more shots of the Wigwam as it grew. If that account checks out it’s an amazing story and in itself a huge reason to revive or at the very least preserve or restore what is left of the signage/facade. The Cine Latino sign is still an eye catcher and with the New Misson directly across the road it’s an interesting pocket of the Mission.
Grand Theater

The Grand Theater opened in 1940, operating primarily as “unpretentious third run neighbourhood house” up until its closure in 1988. Described as a mecca for b-grade, horror and sci-fi movies, the Grand Theater in the late 60’s/70’s sounds like my kind of place. With triple features the norm, no doubt a few Corman masterpieces would have graced the big screen here.Some more Googling turned up some some slightly off topic but interesting info on the cult horror cinema scene in SF. Outlining the horror movie history of the Grand on Cinema Treasures, August Ragone is also the author of a killer book on Eiji Tsuburaya (creator of Godzilla and Ultra Man among a mirrade other things) and a purveyor of underground film events in San Francisco. With the Grand now a cheap import store there’s little chance of the ‘gory’ years of the Grand making a rise from the dead, but it’s great to see the spirit and impact of its years as a gore and sci-fi haunt still kicking in some shape or from. More on August at http://shock-it-to-me.com and http://augustragone.blogspot.com
New Mission Theater

Built in 1916 and fully renovated in a balls-out Art Deco style in 1932, the New Mission Theatre with its sky high marquee is impressive even in its present day state. Like many of these theatres, the New Mission has seen its share of controversy and proposed plans since its closure as a theatre in 1993. Playing horror flicks throughout the 80’s and finally closing in the 90’s due in most part to dwindling attendance, The New Misson’s closure and deterioration is a familiar story. Maybe in part due to the fact the impressive theatre interior is relatively in tact, the New Mission seems to be the most likely of the theatres in the area to have any hope of a complete and deserved restoration. Overcoming the San Francisco City College plans to redevelop/demolish the building as campus space in the late 90’s, preservationists have been working to give the New Mission Theatre a new lease on life for over 10 years. Finally achieving landmark status in 2004, plans for a redevelopment of the theatre for a re-purposed/mixed-use space have been off and off since.
While putting this post together, new info on the New Mission’s future has been made public and from a brief read it’s looking like good news for once. Alamo Drafthouse, an Austin-based cinema chain (with a theatre etiquette policy and public relations approach that should be given a standing ovation) - have prosed a restoration and reopening of the theatre in 2013. More details here. Amazing if all goes to plan. Hopefully next time I’m back in San Fran that towering marquee will be up in lights. With this news, I also came across some recent pics of the theatre interior posted up on the Alamo Facebook page and some Flickr shots here. Great to see the level of detail and fairly in-tact state of the interior.
As a flip side to historical value and preservation, I’ve always had an interest in abandoned buildings and spaces and looking at the those Flickr pics it’s no wonder the Mission Theatre has played host to a free party two in its time. Possibly the ideal progression for America’s grand theatres - the Golden Years, the decline, the non-damaging free party era and the all important restoration. As much as it would be amazing if all of these theatres were still thriving and cared for, the fact is they’ve been left behind and left neglected due to lack of funds, lack of profitably and changing times. It’s the free market that built them, and seemingly the free market that will destroy them. The decline, the free parties, the rotting signs as they stand today as are much a part of the history as the ornate foyers an lavish entrances. In the case of the New Mission at least, history, present day commercial interests and nostalgia may find a workable balance.
What started out as some casual research into the background of this epic strip of busted out signage soon spiralled into a knee-deep dig into the fact and fiction behind San Fransisco’s old school movie houses. This post couldn’t have come together without the below reference and resources. Some great stuff in there if you have a spare week or two. Enjoy!
Cinema TreasuresThe Friends of 1800The San Francisco Neighbourhood Theater FoundationThe San Francisco Public LibraryThe San Francisco Chronicle Cinema Tour

Sign Finds | Misson Street Marquee Mile

Walking down the Mission District end of Mission Street it’s hard not to notice the number of vacant theatres peppered along the strip. As far as sign finds go, old theatre marquees are among some of the biggest, boldest and most extravagant examples you’re likely to see, so finding five early 20th century marquees on the one street was teetering on a signage overload. Seeing so many in such a concentrated strip was almost eerie. They’re huge structures and have some real presence, especially in the case of the Cine Latino and the New Mission Theatre which are set on opposing sides of the road, the two huge signs towering over the relatively small street below. I ran out of light and time to photograph all of them as thoroughly as I would have liked, but what I did shoot has gone some way to capturing that walk through the Mission.

A little miffed by the state of all five theatres I set out to find some background to their current condition, turning up some great archive shots and history in the process. Over time as in other cities, the popularity of TV and home entertainment in the 50’s started the decline of the boom years of America’s cinemas with these grand theatres gradually becoming redundant, unprofitable and as attendance declined were inevitably forced to call it a day. Understandable that as times change, a city and its businesses have to adapt and evolve to suit, it’s just a shame these showy examples of a Golden Age for both cinema and signage haven’t been put to better use - be it restored, respectfully re-purposed or at the very least maintained the for the sake of the city’s local history. Having now survived to an era that should recognise their historic value, it’s madness to not preserve what’s left. A quick look at the list of closed cinemas (not counting demolished) in San Francisco alone is mind blowing.

My rabbit-hole of Googling took me to a wide range of websites, blogs, archives and library sites, with Cinema Treasures again proving to be an invaluable (and impressively well ordered) resource for digging into the fading face of America’s booming cinema years. I’ve included a list of links and references at the end of the post if you’re keen for a dig. 

From 19th to 23rd and Mission we have what’s left of the El Capitan, Tower, Cine Latino, New Mission and The Grand. Between them represents a period of cinema spanning from as early as 1913 to as recent as 1998. All are shown below with all archive shots courtesy the SFPL.

El Capitan Theatre

At one time the second biggest movie theatre in San Francisco, the El Capitan Theatre was demolished in 1961, with only the Mexican Baroque facade left standing. The 2000+ seat auditorium was completely levelled with a budget outdoor parking lot now left in its place. With the huge facade and only the shell of the foyer still in tact, the El Capitan is the grandest and as equally depressing entrances to a crappy car park you’re likely to find. Peep your head in and check out what remains of the foyer interior.

Tower Theater

Inline image 1

First opening as The Majestic Theater in 1912, the Tower Theater was remodelled in a Streamline Moderne style in 1937, majority of which can be seen decaying away today. I’m not sure at what point the vertical TOWER typeface changed to the serif style seen today but from the photos I have found you can see the original style was in use at least until 1975. After closing in 1996, the theatre was used as a church up until 2005 and is currently up for lease. Let’s hope those interior murals are still in tact.

Cine Latino

What now stands as the Cine Latino originally opened as the Wigwam Theatre 1913. With two name changes in between (New Rialoto Theatre in 1935 and the Crown Theatre 1947-74) this workhorse of a movie house has paid its dues, playing host to Latin and Mexican cinema throughout the 70’s until its closure in 1987. With humble beginnings and origins dating back to the San Francisco earthquake in 1906, the Wigwam deserves more than to be left to rot. Hidden amongst the the Cinema Treasures listing for the Cine Latino, a visitor comment outlines the origins of the Wigwam as starting literally as a wigwam to entertain the displaced people of San Francisco in the wake of the massive earthquake that shook majority of the city to the ground. From this small canvas tent grew a bigger tent, then a wooden theatre and then finally the building that now stands on Mission Ave. I’m keen find out more about that evolution from tent to theatre and dig up some more shots of the Wigwam as it grew. If that account checks out it’s an amazing story and in itself a huge reason to revive or at the very least preserve or restore what is left of the signage/facade. The Cine Latino sign is still an eye catcher and with the New Misson directly across the road it’s an interesting pocket of the Mission.

Grand Theater

The Grand Theater opened in 1940, operating primarily as “unpretentious third run neighbourhood house” up until its closure in 1988. Described as a mecca for b-grade, horror and sci-fi movies, the Grand Theater in the late 60’s/70’s sounds like my kind of place. With triple features the norm, no doubt a few Corman masterpieces would have graced the big screen here.

Some more Googling turned up some some slightly off topic but interesting info on the cult horror cinema scene in SF. Outlining the horror movie history of the Grand on Cinema Treasures, August Ragone is also the author of a killer book on Eiji Tsuburaya (creator of Godzilla and Ultra Man among a mirrade other things) and a purveyor of underground film events in San Francisco. With the Grand now a cheap import store there’s little chance of the ‘gory’ years of the Grand making a rise from the dead, but it’s great to see the spirit and impact of its years as a gore and sci-fi haunt still kicking in some shape or from. More on August at http://shock-it-to-me.com and http://augustragone.blogspot.com

New Mission Theater

Built in 1916 and fully renovated in a balls-out Art Deco style in 1932, the New Mission Theatre with its sky high marquee is impressive even in its present day state. Like many of these theatres, the New Mission has seen its share of controversy and proposed plans since its closure as a theatre in 1993. Playing horror flicks throughout the 80’s and finally closing in the 90’s due in most part to dwindling attendance, The New Misson’s closure and deterioration is a familiar story. Maybe in part due to the fact the impressive theatre interior is relatively in tact, the New Mission seems to be the most likely of the theatres in the area to have any hope of a complete and deserved restoration. Overcoming the San Francisco City College plans to redevelop/demolish the building as campus space in the late 90’s, preservationists have been working to give the New Mission Theatre a new lease on life for over 10 years. Finally achieving landmark status in 2004, plans for a redevelopment of the theatre for a re-purposed/mixed-use space have been off and off since.

While putting this post together, new info on the New Mission’s future has been made public and from a brief read it’s looking like good news for once. Alamo Drafthouse, an Austin-based cinema chain (with a theatre etiquette policy and public relations approach that should be given a standing ovation) - have prosed a restoration and reopening of the theatre in 2013. More details here. Amazing if all goes to plan. Hopefully next time I’m back in San Fran that towering marquee will be up in lights. With this news, I also came across some recent pics of the theatre interior posted up on the Alamo Facebook page and some Flickr shots here. Great to see the level of detail and fairly in-tact state of the interior.


As a flip side to historical value and preservation, I’ve always had an interest in abandoned buildings and spaces and looking at the those Flickr pics it’s no wonder the Mission Theatre has played host to a free party two in its time. Possibly the ideal progression for America’s grand theatres - the Golden Years, the decline, the non-damaging free party era and the all important restoration. As much as it would be amazing if all of these theatres were still thriving and cared for, the fact is they’ve been left behind and left neglected due to lack of funds, lack of profitably and changing times. It’s the free market that built them, and seemingly the free market that will destroy them. The decline, the free parties, the rotting signs as they stand today as are much a part of the history as the ornate foyers an lavish entrances. In the case of the New Mission at least, history, present day commercial interests and nostalgia may find a workable balance.


What started out as some casual research into the background of this epic strip of busted out signage soon spiralled into a knee-deep dig into the fact and fiction behind San Fransisco’s old school movie houses. This post couldn’t have come together without the below reference and resources. Some great stuff in there if you have a spare week or two. Enjoy!

Cinema Treasures
The Friends of 1800
The San Francisco Neighbourhood Theater Foundation
The San Francisco Public Library
The San Francisco Chronicle
Cinema Tour

Sunday 19/08/12 2 notes   Reblog
 
The Fold Instagram | thefoldbespoke
The Fold Instagram is up and running so get on board for your dose of signage, found type, work snapshots and other design-eye related ‘grams. Keeping in-line with my Sign Finds posts, I’m tagging all my Instagram signage shots with #signfinds - which seems to be catching on! Get snapping and keep tagging #signfinds!

The Fold Instagram | thefoldbespoke

The Fold Instagram is up and running so get on board for your dose of signage, found type, work snapshots and other design-eye related ‘grams. Keeping in-line with my Sign Finds posts, I’m tagging all my Instagram signage shots with #signfinds - which seems to be catching on! Get snapping and keep tagging #signfinds!

Friday 27/07/12 0 notes   Reblog
 
Black Cabs & Blue Jeans | Levi’s Print Workshop
Last week Levi’s opened their London-based Print Workshop in the Regent Street store, the fifth of its kind for Levi’s following previous workshops in San Fransisco, Los Angeles, New York and Berlin. The Levi’s Print Workshop is an ongoing series celebrating the craft and process of hands-on printmaking and print techniques. This latest instalment is in partnership with renowned graphic artist, Anthony Burrill, with a series of exclusive Print Workshop-centric statement tees available to either buy pre-printed or print fresh in-store.In addition to the Burrill prints, Levi’s are running a daily challenge to Tweet through your London inspired slogans and quotes to the Levi’s UK Twitter with the chosen quote printed and sold in-store the following day. I shot through a few pithy quips with my “Black Cabs & Blue Jeans” statement making the cut for day six. Keen to see the in-store screen printing setup I head in to Regent St to check out the workshop and print up a few of my own tees for the folks back home. All the typefaces, typesetting and screens were all handled by the Levi’s Workshop team, with the printing carousel setup in the front half of the store inked up and ready to go. Stumbling across both People of Print and Wicked Printing in the process was an added bonus, putting me a little closer to finding somewhere in London to get my massive A0 silk screens exposed. It was cool to see a few photos of my tee popping up on my the Levi’s feed and flex my squeegee skills for the first time since leaving Aus. Having designed a tee or two(thousand) in the past, it would have been extra rad to see the daily slogans set in the same lockup as the Burrill prints to give them a little more clout - but all in all, Tweet to tee in 24 hours ain’t half bad. Original Content. © All images copyright The Fold. Black Cabs & Blue Jeans | Levi’s Print Workshop
Last week Levi’s opened their London-based Print Workshop in the Regent Street store, the fifth of its kind for Levi’s following previous workshops in San Fransisco, Los Angeles, New York and Berlin. The Levi’s Print Workshop is an ongoing series celebrating the craft and process of hands-on printmaking and print techniques. This latest instalment is in partnership with renowned graphic artist, Anthony Burrill, with a series of exclusive Print Workshop-centric statement tees available to either buy pre-printed or print fresh in-store.In addition to the Burrill prints, Levi’s are running a daily challenge to Tweet through your London inspired slogans and quotes to the Levi’s UK Twitter with the chosen quote printed and sold in-store the following day. I shot through a few pithy quips with my “Black Cabs & Blue Jeans” statement making the cut for day six. Keen to see the in-store screen printing setup I head in to Regent St to check out the workshop and print up a few of my own tees for the folks back home. All the typefaces, typesetting and screens were all handled by the Levi’s Workshop team, with the printing carousel setup in the front half of the store inked up and ready to go. Stumbling across both People of Print and Wicked Printing in the process was an added bonus, putting me a little closer to finding somewhere in London to get my massive A0 silk screens exposed. It was cool to see a few photos of my tee popping up on my the Levi’s feed and flex my squeegee skills for the first time since leaving Aus. Having designed a tee or two(thousand) in the past, it would have been extra rad to see the daily slogans set in the same lockup as the Burrill prints to give them a little more clout - but all in all, Tweet to tee in 24 hours ain’t half bad. Original Content. © All images copyright The Fold. Black Cabs & Blue Jeans | Levi’s Print Workshop
Last week Levi’s opened their London-based Print Workshop in the Regent Street store, the fifth of its kind for Levi’s following previous workshops in San Fransisco, Los Angeles, New York and Berlin. The Levi’s Print Workshop is an ongoing series celebrating the craft and process of hands-on printmaking and print techniques. This latest instalment is in partnership with renowned graphic artist, Anthony Burrill, with a series of exclusive Print Workshop-centric statement tees available to either buy pre-printed or print fresh in-store.In addition to the Burrill prints, Levi’s are running a daily challenge to Tweet through your London inspired slogans and quotes to the Levi’s UK Twitter with the chosen quote printed and sold in-store the following day. I shot through a few pithy quips with my “Black Cabs & Blue Jeans” statement making the cut for day six. Keen to see the in-store screen printing setup I head in to Regent St to check out the workshop and print up a few of my own tees for the folks back home. All the typefaces, typesetting and screens were all handled by the Levi’s Workshop team, with the printing carousel setup in the front half of the store inked up and ready to go. Stumbling across both People of Print and Wicked Printing in the process was an added bonus, putting me a little closer to finding somewhere in London to get my massive A0 silk screens exposed. It was cool to see a few photos of my tee popping up on my the Levi’s feed and flex my squeegee skills for the first time since leaving Aus. Having designed a tee or two(thousand) in the past, it would have been extra rad to see the daily slogans set in the same lockup as the Burrill prints to give them a little more clout - but all in all, Tweet to tee in 24 hours ain’t half bad. Original Content. © All images copyright The Fold. Black Cabs & Blue Jeans | Levi’s Print Workshop
Last week Levi’s opened their London-based Print Workshop in the Regent Street store, the fifth of its kind for Levi’s following previous workshops in San Fransisco, Los Angeles, New York and Berlin. The Levi’s Print Workshop is an ongoing series celebrating the craft and process of hands-on printmaking and print techniques. This latest instalment is in partnership with renowned graphic artist, Anthony Burrill, with a series of exclusive Print Workshop-centric statement tees available to either buy pre-printed or print fresh in-store.In addition to the Burrill prints, Levi’s are running a daily challenge to Tweet through your London inspired slogans and quotes to the Levi’s UK Twitter with the chosen quote printed and sold in-store the following day. I shot through a few pithy quips with my “Black Cabs & Blue Jeans” statement making the cut for day six. Keen to see the in-store screen printing setup I head in to Regent St to check out the workshop and print up a few of my own tees for the folks back home. All the typefaces, typesetting and screens were all handled by the Levi’s Workshop team, with the printing carousel setup in the front half of the store inked up and ready to go. Stumbling across both People of Print and Wicked Printing in the process was an added bonus, putting me a little closer to finding somewhere in London to get my massive A0 silk screens exposed. It was cool to see a few photos of my tee popping up on my the Levi’s feed and flex my squeegee skills for the first time since leaving Aus. Having designed a tee or two(thousand) in the past, it would have been extra rad to see the daily slogans set in the same lockup as the Burrill prints to give them a little more clout - but all in all, Tweet to tee in 24 hours ain’t half bad. Original Content. © All images copyright The Fold. Black Cabs & Blue Jeans | Levi’s Print Workshop
Last week Levi’s opened their London-based Print Workshop in the Regent Street store, the fifth of its kind for Levi’s following previous workshops in San Fransisco, Los Angeles, New York and Berlin. The Levi’s Print Workshop is an ongoing series celebrating the craft and process of hands-on printmaking and print techniques. This latest instalment is in partnership with renowned graphic artist, Anthony Burrill, with a series of exclusive Print Workshop-centric statement tees available to either buy pre-printed or print fresh in-store.In addition to the Burrill prints, Levi’s are running a daily challenge to Tweet through your London inspired slogans and quotes to the Levi’s UK Twitter with the chosen quote printed and sold in-store the following day. I shot through a few pithy quips with my “Black Cabs & Blue Jeans” statement making the cut for day six. Keen to see the in-store screen printing setup I head in to Regent St to check out the workshop and print up a few of my own tees for the folks back home. All the typefaces, typesetting and screens were all handled by the Levi’s Workshop team, with the printing carousel setup in the front half of the store inked up and ready to go. Stumbling across both People of Print and Wicked Printing in the process was an added bonus, putting me a little closer to finding somewhere in London to get my massive A0 silk screens exposed. It was cool to see a few photos of my tee popping up on my the Levi’s feed and flex my squeegee skills for the first time since leaving Aus. Having designed a tee or two(thousand) in the past, it would have been extra rad to see the daily slogans set in the same lockup as the Burrill prints to give them a little more clout - but all in all, Tweet to tee in 24 hours ain’t half bad. Original Content. © All images copyright The Fold.

Black Cabs & Blue Jeans | Levi’s Print Workshop

Last week Levi’s opened their London-based Print Workshop in the Regent Street store, the fifth of its kind for Levi’s following previous workshops in San Fransisco, Los Angeles, New York and Berlin. The Levi’s Print Workshop is an ongoing series celebrating the craft and process of hands-on printmaking and print techniques. This latest instalment is in partnership with renowned graphic artist, Anthony Burrill, with a series of exclusive Print Workshop-centric statement tees available to either buy pre-printed or print fresh in-store.

In addition to the Burrill prints, Levi’s are running a daily challenge to Tweet through your London inspired slogans and quotes to the Levi’s UK Twitter with the chosen quote printed and sold in-store the following day. I shot through a few pithy quips with my “Black Cabs & Blue Jeans” statement making the cut for day six. Keen to see the in-store screen printing setup I head in to Regent St to check out the workshop and print up a few of my own tees for the folks back home. All the typefaces, typesetting and screens were all handled by the Levi’s Workshop team, with the printing carousel setup in the front half of the store inked up and ready to go. Stumbling across both People of Print and Wicked Printing in the process was an added bonus, putting me a little closer to finding somewhere in London to get my massive A0 silk screens exposed. It was cool to see a few photos of my tee popping up on my the Levi’s feed and flex my squeegee skills for the first time since leaving Aus. Having designed a tee or two(thousand) in the past, it would have been extra rad to see the daily slogans set in the same lockup as the Burrill prints to give them a little more clout - but all in all, Tweet to tee in 24 hours ain’t half bad. Original Content. © All images copyright The Fold.

Tuesday 24/07/12 0 notes   Reblog
 
The Fold | Heaps Good
This Polly Waffle flavoured illustration was a little something I put together for an interview I did with the guys at Heaps Good, a space dedicated to supporting and promoting Aussie creativity throughout the UK. Check out my interview here along with loads of other Australian/UK creative news and info. Original Content. © All images copyright The Fold.

The Fold | Heaps Good

This Polly Waffle flavoured illustration was a little something I put together for an interview I did with the guys at Heaps Good, a space dedicated to supporting and promoting Aussie creativity throughout the UK. Check out my interview here along with loads of other Australian/UK creative news and info. Original Content. © All images copyright The Fold.

Wednesday 18/07/12 9 notes   Reblog
 
Fold Frame | The Owl Barber Shop, Downtown Los Angeles
Inspired by an article in the back pages of Los Angeles magazine, I set out to capture a similar photo-in-a-photo style shot during my time in L.A. A bit of trawling through the archives struck gold, turning up a great shot from 1960 of ‘The Owl Barber Shop’ Downtown on E 6th. The photo itself is great - classic car, old school barbershop and vintage shop signage all together in one hit. After finding that little gem I was pretty set on making it happen. With a bit more research I managed to pinpoint the area and exact address of the shop, you can see the Google map shot here. Amazingly, still a salon to this day. Not a barber shop, but was cool to see the history of the shop carried on in some way. I’m happy with the result for a first attempt and managed to sneak in another location shot while I was in the States. Big thanks to Holly for helping with the shoot and fending off the Downtown traffic (both car and pedestrian) and to Eric Mercado and Duston Snipes for triggering the idea.Edit: Some more digging turned up a great photo of the shop in 2003, and a typically Hollywood side note detailing the use of the shop for a small scene in Se7en. In a noir-esque game of shadows, the sandwich deli next door was used in L.A Confidential, providing the location for the ‘The Nite Owl Coffee Shop’ - home of the pivitol shit-hits-the-fan Nite Owl Massacre. For those playing along at home, you can get a quick glimpse of the barber shop at the start of the Nite Owl scene here. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.

Fold Frame | The Owl Barber Shop, Downtown Los Angeles

Inspired by an article in the back pages of Los Angeles magazine, I set out to capture a similar photo-in-a-photo style shot during my time in L.A. A bit of trawling through the archives struck gold, turning up a great shot from 1960 of ‘The Owl Barber Shop’ Downtown on E 6th. The photo itself is great - classic car, old school barbershop and vintage shop signage all together in one hit. After finding that little gem I was pretty set on making it happen. With a bit more research I managed to pinpoint the area and exact address of the shop, you can see the Google map shot here. Amazingly, still a salon to this day. Not a barber shop, but was cool to see the history of the shop carried on in some way.

I’m happy with the result for a first attempt and managed to sneak in another location shot while I was in the States. Big thanks to Holly for helping with the shoot and fending off the Downtown traffic (both car and pedestrian) and to Eric Mercado and Duston Snipes for triggering the idea.

Edit: Some more digging turned up a great photo of the shop in 2003, and a typically Hollywood side note detailing the use of the shop for a small scene in Se7en. In a noir-esque game of shadows, the sandwich deli next door was used in L.A Confidential, providing the location for the ‘The Nite Owl Coffee Shop’ - home of the pivitol shit-hits-the-fan Nite Owl Massacre. For those playing along at home, you can get a quick glimpse of the barber shop at the start of the Nite Owl scene here. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.

Friday 13/07/12 4 notes   Reblog
 
Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali
The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.
Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.
These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.
With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.
Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali
The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.
Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.
These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.
With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.
Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali
The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.
Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.
These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.
With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.
Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali
The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.
Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.
These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.
With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.
Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali
The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.
Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.
These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.
With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.
Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali
The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.
Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.
These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.
With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.
Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali
The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.
Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.
These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.
With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.
Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali
The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.
Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.
These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.
With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.

Fold Finds - La Cimbali Microcimbali

The coffee scene in London is no doubt on the up since I was last in town. There’s a caffeine induced buzz around ‘good coffee’ that is going some way to undo decades of chain coffee dominance. It’s great to see more awareness and appreciation of coffee in general and even better to see the variety of independent and dedicated businesses popping up across London. That said, these coffee-centric cafes are the exception not the standard so finding a good coffee can still be a challenge.

Without a local go-to for my morning fix, what started out as casual research into home espresso machines grew quickly into hours of trawling coffee forums and blogs, late night BableFish translations and ended with a purchase on Italian eBay. Once I stumbled across the 60’s Italian lever machines there really wasn’t any going back. The Microcimbali, the Arrarex Caravel, the Baby Faema and the Zerowatt Express are all great looking examples of atomic age product design. Having left my classic car resto back in Melbourne, a vintage espresso machine rebuild seemed vaguely justifiable. The Microcimbali narrowly edged out the Caravel through the handy inclusion of a steam wand for foamy milk drinks… although, with the Caravels coming up fairly frequently on eBay the Mirco may have to share some bench space at some point down the line.

These single group hand lever machines were primarily intended for the home espresso market, the commercial machines of that era are in a whole ‘nother rare and expensive world of design. With the espresso machine taking a jukebox-like pride of place in cafes across Italy, the manufacturers understood the importance of good design. Beautifully crafted and unique in style. Notable product designers were often enlisted, the Microcimbali for example was designed by acclaimed product designer Joe Colombo. Look up the game changing Faema E61 or 50s-60’s Gaggia machines to get a snapshot of what I’m talking about. Earlier periods of machine design are equally as impressive and reflective of design trends of the time. Evolving from the ornate almost Baroque style of the early 20th century to a more streamlined Deco style through to the atomic chic of the 50’s and 60’s.

With the going price for an E61 at around the £1,500 mark (and way beyond) I’m happy to start off with my modest Microcimbali. It’s in good shape for a fixer-upper - operational but far from usable. Before it comes anywhere near a ground bean I’ll be stripping the whole machine down, cleaning every nook and cranny, seeing to the wiring, removing the years of limescale and replacing all seals from top to bottom. From what I have read and pulled apart so so far it’s a reasonably straight forward and compact unit to restore. Provided I can score myself a bargain on a suitable grinder I’ll be pumping out the home espressos soon enough. Original Content.© All images copyright The Fold.

Saturday 07/07/12 12 notes   Reblog
 
Sign Finds | Cordon’s Market - Hollywood
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Sign Finds | Cordon’s Market - Hollywood
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Sign Finds | Cordon’s Market - Hollywood

© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Sunday 06/05/12 3 notes   Reblog
 
Sign Finds | Echo Park
Echo Park is a hotspot for signage. Plenty of old school relics, oddities and hand painted work to keep things interesting. Kicking myself I didn’t get a chance to shoot the LA Popular shopfront… any fellow sign obsessives in LA get on the case and post up your find!
Sign Finds | Echo Park
Echo Park is a hotspot for signage. Plenty of old school relics, oddities and hand painted work to keep things interesting. Kicking myself I didn’t get a chance to shoot the LA Popular shopfront… any fellow sign obsessives in LA get on the case and post up your find!
Sign Finds | Echo Park
Echo Park is a hotspot for signage. Plenty of old school relics, oddities and hand painted work to keep things interesting. Kicking myself I didn’t get a chance to shoot the LA Popular shopfront… any fellow sign obsessives in LA get on the case and post up your find!
Sign Finds | Echo Park
Echo Park is a hotspot for signage. Plenty of old school relics, oddities and hand painted work to keep things interesting. Kicking myself I didn’t get a chance to shoot the LA Popular shopfront… any fellow sign obsessives in LA get on the case and post up your find!
Sign Finds | Echo Park
Echo Park is a hotspot for signage. Plenty of old school relics, oddities and hand painted work to keep things interesting. Kicking myself I didn’t get a chance to shoot the LA Popular shopfront… any fellow sign obsessives in LA get on the case and post up your find!

Sign Finds | Echo Park

Echo Park is a hotspot for signage. Plenty of old school relics, oddities and hand painted work to keep things interesting. Kicking myself I didn’t get a chance to shoot the LA Popular shopfront… any fellow sign obsessives in LA get on the case and post up your find!

Saturday 05/05/12 2 notes   Reblog
 
Sign Finds - Pismo Beach
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Sign Finds - Pismo Beach
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Sign Finds - Pismo Beach

© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Monday 23/04/12 2 notes   Reblog
 
Sign Finds | Foxy Lady
A few happy snaps from Mission Ave and beyond. From the look of the signage I assumed Foxy Lady had closed long ago… but that’s just how they roll in the Mission, the high-style boutique is still kicking with glowing praise (“Really good prices and a great selection of hot ho wear.”) and a respectable 4 stars on Yelp. Wowza. Great looking shopfront, proving once again you can can never go wrong with porthole windows.
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Sign Finds | Foxy Lady
A few happy snaps from Mission Ave and beyond. From the look of the signage I assumed Foxy Lady had closed long ago… but that’s just how they roll in the Mission, the high-style boutique is still kicking with glowing praise (“Really good prices and a great selection of hot ho wear.”) and a respectable 4 stars on Yelp. Wowza. Great looking shopfront, proving once again you can can never go wrong with porthole windows.
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Sign Finds | Foxy Lady
A few happy snaps from Mission Ave and beyond. From the look of the signage I assumed Foxy Lady had closed long ago… but that’s just how they roll in the Mission, the high-style boutique is still kicking with glowing praise (“Really good prices and a great selection of hot ho wear.”) and a respectable 4 stars on Yelp. Wowza. Great looking shopfront, proving once again you can can never go wrong with porthole windows.
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Sign Finds | Foxy Lady
A few happy snaps from Mission Ave and beyond. From the look of the signage I assumed Foxy Lady had closed long ago… but that’s just how they roll in the Mission, the high-style boutique is still kicking with glowing praise (“Really good prices and a great selection of hot ho wear.”) and a respectable 4 stars on Yelp. Wowza. Great looking shopfront, proving once again you can can never go wrong with porthole windows.
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Sign Finds | Foxy Lady

A few happy snaps from Mission Ave and beyond. From the look of the signage I assumed Foxy Lady had closed long ago… but that’s just how they roll in the Mission, the high-style boutique is still kicking with glowing praise (“Really good prices and a great selection of hot ho wear.”) and a respectable 4 stars on Yelp. Wowza. Great looking shopfront, proving once again you can can never go wrong with porthole windows.

© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Tuesday 27/03/12 0 notes   Reblog
 
Sign Finds | San Francisco
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Sign Finds | San Francisco
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Sign Finds | San Francisco
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Sign Finds | San Francisco

© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Wednesday 21/03/12 1 note   Reblog
 
Fold Finds | Rhea’s Deli & Market
Killer veggie sandwich at Rhea’s… seriously good munch. Finding a decent veggie sandwich is a real hit an miss affair so finding a hole-in-the-wall corner deli that has taken the time to do a veggie roll proper is a treat. Rhea’s deserves the praise it gets for going the extra mile to make that happen. It’s a well known spot in SF and I’m not surprised… these are close to the best deli style lunch rolls I’ve had not only in Cali but the States and beyond. For the veggos out there, if you’re ever in the area be sure to duck in and put your name down for the veggie chicken BBQ, medium chilli or hot if you’re a spice fiend… that thing was hot as hell. Just don’t call them ‘sandos’. © Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Fold Finds | Rhea’s Deli & Market
Killer veggie sandwich at Rhea’s… seriously good munch. Finding a decent veggie sandwich is a real hit an miss affair so finding a hole-in-the-wall corner deli that has taken the time to do a veggie roll proper is a treat. Rhea’s deserves the praise it gets for going the extra mile to make that happen. It’s a well known spot in SF and I’m not surprised… these are close to the best deli style lunch rolls I’ve had not only in Cali but the States and beyond. For the veggos out there, if you’re ever in the area be sure to duck in and put your name down for the veggie chicken BBQ, medium chilli or hot if you’re a spice fiend… that thing was hot as hell. Just don’t call them ‘sandos’. © Original Content. All images copyright The Fold. Fold Finds | Rhea’s Deli & Market
Killer veggie sandwich at Rhea’s… seriously good munch. Finding a decent veggie sandwich is a real hit an miss affair so finding a hole-in-the-wall corner deli that has taken the time to do a veggie roll proper is a treat. Rhea’s deserves the praise it gets for going the extra mile to make that happen. It’s a well known spot in SF and I’m not surprised… these are close to the best deli style lunch rolls I’ve had not only in Cali but the States and beyond. For the veggos out there, if you’re ever in the area be sure to duck in and put your name down for the veggie chicken BBQ, medium chilli or hot if you’re a spice fiend… that thing was hot as hell. Just don’t call them ‘sandos’. © Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Fold Finds | Rhea’s Deli & Market

Killer veggie sandwich at Rhea’s… seriously good munch. Finding a decent veggie sandwich is a real hit an miss affair so finding a hole-in-the-wall corner deli that has taken the time to do a veggie roll proper is a treat. Rhea’s deserves the praise it gets for going the extra mile to make that happen. It’s a well known spot in SF and I’m not surprised… these are close to the best deli style lunch rolls I’ve had not only in Cali but the States and beyond. For the veggos out there, if you’re ever in the area be sure to duck in and put your name down for the veggie chicken BBQ, medium chilli or hot if you’re a spice fiend… that thing was hot as hell. Just don’t call them ‘sandos’. © Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Wednesday 21/03/12 1 note   Reblog
 
Sophy Salon - The Mission, San Francisco
© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Sophy Salon - The Mission, San Francisco

© Original Content. All images copyright The Fold.

Wednesday 21/03/12 1 note   Reblog